In like a lion, out like a lamb

Have you ever heard the saying March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb? Well, in honor of entering March, educationbug.org is taking a look at one of the most popular March weather-related sayings of all time, “In like a lion, out like lamb.” The saying can also be said in reverse depending on what weather the beginning of March brings us. Check out EducationBug to read about other famous sayings and idioms like, Eye for an Eye and Cry Wolf.
As we enter the springtime months, we often speculate if we will be blessed with sunny skies and T-Shirt weather, or if we will have to open up those umbrellas and stay bundled a little while longer through the month of March. Many of us might think back to the old well-known saying March comes In like a lion, out like lamb. Where did this saying originate? “In like a lion, out like lamb” is one of the most popular weather sayings we know to day. According to The Farmers Almanac, the popular saying is derived from members of ancient civilizations who often believed that spirits played a role in the outcome of the weather. Depending on the spirits’ motive, whether good or bad, would affect the type of weather we see. These people believed in the idea that there needed to be a balance in life and the weather, hence the saying “In like a lion, out like lamb.” Because March is stuck in the transition period of winter changing to spring, many areas around the globe see the most adverse weather conditions during March. This is why the popular phrase “In like a lion, out like lamb” is so commonly used in reference to this particular month. The saying can held true in many instances. Ultimately however, this saying is more of a rhyme rather than an accurate saying to depict March weather.
Other March weather sayings include:
  • A dry March and a wet May? Fill barns and bays with corn and hay.
  • As it rains in March, so it rains in June.
  • March winds and April Showers bring forth May flowers.
Check out our new Popular Phrases and Sayings section on educationbug.org to learn about other commonly used phrases and sayings and the meanings behind them. We are adding new articles to this category regularly. Also, you can follow us by adding us to your RSS feed or by following our blog. Don’t forget to like EducationBug on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!